Carl Spielvogel, a Longtime Power in Advertising, Dies at 92

1 BUSINESS

Business News - Opportunities - Reviews

 

 

Within weeks, Backer & Spielvogel was founded.

It had no staff, no office, no clients, only an idea: In the age of the global superagency, born of many mergers, it would be something new — a miniature superagency run by seasoned corporate executives with the clout and experience to handle a small number of blue-chip clients who would receive personal attention from an agency owner.

“It rocked the industry,” Mr. Spielvogel said in a 2017 interview for this obituary. “It had none of the disadvantages of being big — the cost overruns, the endless meetings, the distant relationships among agency and client people. And it had all the advantages of being small — the flexibility to be imaginative, real personal service, control over the budgets and, above all, the freedom to have fun.”

He died on Wednesday at 92, at a hospital in Manhattan, said Deborah Bershad, the assistant of his wife, Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel.

Within three months of its founding, Backer & Spielvogel had landed its first account, Miller beer, with $85 million in annual billings — and a 15 percent commission for B & S. Miller had left Interpublic and joined the partners’ new agency, drawn by its owners’ proven success. In their old jobs, Mr. Spielvogel had managed marketing and Mr. Backer had handled the creative side of the Miller campaign.

That campaign had been based on one idea: that blue-collar workers drank most of the beer in America. Focusing on that audience, the ads featured hard hats and laborers settling down for a few cans of Miller after work. “It’s Miller Time,” the voice-over said. Sales popped like champagne corks. Miller Lite, introduced in 1975, became “everything you ever wanted in a beer … and less.”

1 BUSINESS

Business News - Opportunities - Reviews

 

 

Leave a Reply